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Diamond Tread Quilt

Diamond Tread quilt

My Diamond Tread quilt is complete! And the pattern for this quilt is now available as well! Woot!

I created this design a few months ago for my post on the Threadbias Quilt Design Tool blog hop. I was excited about the block that I came up with using the Design Tool—but not so excited about the 9 million half-square triangles an all-over design would have required. I realized that this type of design is where negative space really becomes your friend. : ) It looks great, and it rescues you from making so many HSTs that you start seeing them in your sleep. Who wouldn’t love that?

Diamond Tread quilt
I was so in love with the resulting design that I had to drop everything and make it immediately. When I blogged about it, someone suggested in a blog comment that this design resembles the diamond tread pattern that is sometimes stamped into metal. Sure enough, that’s exactly what it looks like to me. I also like how the long, narrow section of Diamond Tread blocks looks a little like a tire track. So “Diamond Tread” was the perfect name for this pattern.

I was pleased with this design right from the start, and I love the finished quilt even more, so I’m extra thrilled to be making the Diamond Tread pattern available now too. The PDF version of the pattern is now for sale via my pattern shop, Craftsy, and Threadbias.

And for a limited time, I’m offering it for only $3.99—that’s 50% off regular price! I’m doing some price experimenting, so snap this one up before the experiment ends. : ) (Hard-copy versions of the pattern will be coming in the next week or two, but will not be on sale.)

Diamond Tread - All-Over design

This 8-page, full-color pattern is perfect for beginners, since it’s just half-square triangle units and squares. As always, I’ve included plenty of diagrams and illustrations to take you through every step in the process. And of course, I know not everyone is as big a fan of negative space as I am, so my pattern includes full instructions for two design variations: One variation features the negative space (as shown in all my quilt photos on this post), while the other is an all-over pattern, shown in the digital mock-up above. One pattern, two designs, three sizes (Crib, Lap, and Twin)—how’s that for bang for your buck?

Diamond Tread pattern cover

Pattern Stats
Name: Diamond Tread Pattern
Skill level: Easy
Finished sizes: Crib (45″ x 60″), Lap (52-1/2″ x 75″), Twin (76″ x 90″); two design varitations
Price: $3.99 on sale for a limited time (normally $7.99)
Available: My pattern shopCraftsy, and Threadbias

Diamond Tread quilt
Hope you all enjoy the pattern. Have a wonderful Tuesday—see you back here tomorrow for WIP Wednesday!

 

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AnneMarie’s Quilt

As you may have already heard, my friend AnneMarie of Gen X Quilters recently added a new member to her family! She had a rough, uncomfortable pregnancy, so Elizabeth, Amy and I decided to get together and surprise her with a little something for the baby. I’m guessing her new little man has plenty of quilts, but you can always use another one made by friends, right? : )

We decided on some basic, bright-colored, fun log-cabin blocks. Each of us made three blocks, and I quilted it.

I put some of my favorite little-boy prints on the back—the brown and blue plaid from Katie Jump Rope, a Pezzy print, and a few others.

I’ve been wanting to improve my straight-line quilting, so I opted for straight lines on the diagonal across the quilt. I recently got a new walking foot that has this quilting guide on it—why didn’t I know about this little doohickey before?? It makes straight-line quilting so much easier, no marking necessary! I just marked the center diagonal and used the guide to work my way out from there. The only problem with using a quilting guide like this is if you get a little crooked or curvy on one line, all the lines after that will be the same, because you’re always using the previous line as your guide. In fact, the flaws might even be magnified as you stitch more and more lines. So I sometimes took the quilt off my machine, laid it out on the floor and inspected my lines. If they were looking a little crazy, I marked the next line in order to straighten things out again. But I only had to do that 3 or 4 times, I’d say.

And it turns out that I really don’t mind straight-line quilting—as long as I don’t have to turn the darn quilt! It’s the turning that I despise. So you may see more edge-to-edge straight-line quilting from me in the future.

Congratulations, AnneMarie, on the addition to your family! Enjoy the quilt!